It’s really weird getting all dressed up and not doing something fun. Or going to a funeral.

sachinteng:

Manifest Destiny
My piece for Space! The Gallery Show.  The show’s about our exploration of space and discovery. And if history’s any indicator things might not go so smooth. I’m looking at you British Empire.

Oh man, I like this and I want this.

sachinteng:

Manifest Destiny

My piece for Space! The Gallery Show.  The show’s about our exploration of space and discovery. And if history’s any indicator things might not go so smooth. I’m looking at you British Empire.

Oh man, I like this and I want this.

faitherinhicks:

faitherinhicks:

I’m up super early due to a stomach ache, so I thought I’d post something while my insides get sorted. 

These are two pages from The Nameless City (my current comic project, check the tag for more stuff) that I redid. I don’t normally redraw comic pages, but one page required some heavy revisions, and I was pretty unhappy with the other page, so I figured I’d just scrap them and redo them (the original pages are on the left, the redone ones on the right). The nice thing about my recent switch to digital penciling is that “redoing” basically meant edits to the digital pencils, which I then printed out and re-inked. So I didn’t have to completely re-draw the pages from scratch. Bless you, digital  penciling! This was so much less time consuming than if I’d had to completely redraw the pages traditionally.

The revisions that I needed to do were on the second page (row two). My editor said that the way I’d drawn the top row of panels in the original page (on the left) made the character (Kai) look he was fainting, rather than stepping back, missing a step and falling backwards. I totally agree, and feel very ashamed for not noticing that when drawing the page originally! :D That is why I like working with an editor: they catch the things you miss. 

So I re-drew that row of panels, so now the focus is on Kai stepping backwards, rather than his dad rambling on. 

The other page (first row) is the previous page in the book, and it actually didn’t have any revision notes, but as I mentioned, I was unhappy with how I drew it. So I did some edits to the pencils, making the building a little more impressive, and adding in some bleeds (when a comic panel bleeds off the edge of a page) to make the panels have more impact.

To Bleed or Not to Bleed is something I’m always struggling with. I like bleeds a lot; I think they can have much more impact than non-bleed panels, because the panel becomes larger, and thus more “important” in a reader’s mind. Or that’s my theory at least. ;) I don’t really have a particular technique when using bleeds. I tend to use them intuitively, in instances when they feel “right.” But I tend to think less is more with bleeds, so I don’t like to always have panels bleeding off a page. It’s fun to break things up and try different things. Keeps the readers on their toes!

Anyway, hope you enjoyed this little peek into my process of trying to make the best comic possible. :) (Oh, and that is not final text, just text dropped in to make it easier for my editor to read & give me notes.)

non-holiday reblog!

This is a really neat teaching tool too. 

Compare the changes of the left to the original on the right. You can see that in the first panel she used space more efficiently by putting the speech bubbles in “empty” space in-between the characters, which draws more attention to the immediacy of their situation, rather than let the eye dwindle in the background. Also the close-ups of the son in the third and fifth panels draw us as the reader more in-line with his point of view. Now the change to the largest panel is the most interesting. She made the buildings more impressive, with your eye being drawn from the top of the building (rising over the third panel) diagonally down to the left and out of the hole of the cave. She then balanced it by moving the boy’s head to the left instead of leaving it weighted down to the right. I would argue, however, that this new portrayal takes away from the extravagance of the cave itself and puts more emphasis on the building. I think if she left in a few of the plant ridges in the cave’s walls, she would help bring back the “awe” feeling of the cave, instead of just leaving it with the building and hole. 

And yes, the left side of the second page makes it looks like he’s fainting rather than falling off of a step, and the changes she made make it much clearer. Sometimes you have to be plain and simple with basic architecture to get the point across. She also did a good job of making the situation more dramatic with the use of extra lines in the fourth and sixth panels. Erasing details of the background in the fifth panel and making the boy’s shadow more apparent brings our attention to the characters in this scene. Sometimes simplicity is the best tool.

Overall a really great revision and a neat behind-the-scenes look into the world of comics! Can’t wait to see more Faith Erin Hicks.

why do i want to work at an office?

because i watched a lot of ”the office” and “office space” and thought it looked easy.

(Source: dorrismccomics, via hardyseadog)

Do the dumb things you gotta do.

bobschofield:

sailorsandshipwrecks:

This is too intense

feeling this

(Source: ricktimus, via calloohcallaycahill)

nevver:

What we’re reading

reading and responding to the comments on articles posted by news broadcasters on facebook will be the death of me.

All I wanna do is barrel through reading MaddAddam.

is it okay to be disappointed when you find out a singer you thought was black is actually white?

clickholeofficial:


5 Disney Princesses Reimagined As Caucasian

clickholeofficial:

5 Disney Princesses Reimagined As Caucasian

(via theonion)

A comic
A blog

A comic

A blog